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5 things that rocked this week #4

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The weekly round up of what we’ve been listening to / reading / loving in the Manifest office continues. Check out what’s rocked our week… Read the full story

Come work with us!

WLTM

After 2 amazing years in Leeds, we’re looking to grow the Manifest family even more and have loads of new, exciting roles up for grabs. So if you fancy working for the North’s most fun-loving, award winning agency drop us a line, it’ll be the best thing you’ve done since you got a little tipsy and decided to ride that bucking bronco whilst belting out ‘Achy-Breaky Heart’.  Read the full story

Bricking it – but in the good way

Imagine if someone said that they could build the shell of a house in a day – and when I say house I don’t mean a dog house, or a lego house, or the sort of house you tried to build in a tree when you were little with a mouldy old plank and your dad’s shed glue (in hindsight, that was a mistake). No, I mean a PROPER, lasting masonry building. In a day.
The obvious reaction would be to say that such an outlandish-sounding claim could only have been made by an individual a few tiles short of a roof. And yet, after an eye-opening work experience day with Manifest’s favourite construction client, Wienerberger, this notion became strangely plausible.
I was invited to attend a demonstration of Wienerberger’s flagship clay block walling system, Porotherm, and to see first hand some of the pretty special qualities that it can bring to the build process. Now, not necessarily being famed for my masonry abilities, I think you can forgive me a few apprehensions on discovering that I would be trusted, as part of a willing team of Wienerberger marketing staff, to build a 5ft wall – in just 5 minutes! It sounded somewhat implausible, and conjured unnerving premonitions of a wide variety of mortar-based mishaps.
With that very much in mind, the unexpectedly glorious wall that we produced is as strong an endorsement of Porotherm as it is ever likely to get – a testament to the special design and properties of the system itself. Needing just a cursory coat of mortar, and for the blocks to be placed so that the interlocking grooves line up, the wall in question rose from the ground faster than a hurried Lazarus.
Okay, so even with Porotherm and an experienced builder on hand, it probably wouldn’t be realistic to expect to put up the walls of a house in a day – but they could probably get pretty close! At this point I should mention that much of my own wall-based endeavour, and indeed that of my team for the day, was precipitated by Wienerberger’s resident Porotherm master, Darren Bould, having completed the tricky technical work on the base in true here’s-one-I-did-earlier Blue Peter style.
Even so, it was still a bit of a shock to find myself and others to be so competent in building this wall, not to mention the first-hand experience of working with a system that could well herald a sea-change in the way the industry approaches everyday construction. But the day wasn’t just an opportunity for me to release my long repressed inner brickie; it also gave the firmest foundation (sorry) possible on which to build (sorry) a castle (sorry) of PR.
As any agency knows, gaining the knowledge and understanding of a client’s offering to market is simply invaluable; a fundamental tenant of effective and momentum-generating public relations work. Which is why, despite ending the day with my coat caked in clay dust, my shoes flecked with mortar like a bad attempt at Jackson Pollock-lite footwear, and having not sent an email all day, those four hours of Porotherm immersion will prove to be the most useful and productive PR outing I’ve had all year.

Imagine if someone said that they could build the shell of a house in a day – and when I say house I don’t mean a dog house, or a lego house, or the sort of house you tried to build in a tree when you were little with a mouldy old plank and your dad’s shed glue (in hindsight, that was a mistake). No, I mean a PROPER, lasting masonry building. In a day.

The obvious reaction would be to say that such an outlandish-sounding claim could only have been made by an individual a few tiles short of a roof. And yet, after an eye-opening work experience day with Manifest’s favourite construction client, Wienerberger, this notion became strangely plausible.

I was invited to attend a demonstration of Wienerberger’s flagship clay block walling system, Porotherm, and to see first hand some of the pretty special qualities that it can bring to the build process. Now, not necessarily being famed for my masonry abilities, I think you can forgive me a few apprehensions on discovering that I would be trusted, as part of a willing team of Wienerberger marketing staff, to build a 5ft wall – in just 5 minutes! It sounded somewhat implausible, and conjured unnerving premonitions of a wide variety of mortar-based mishaps.

With that very much in mind, the unexpectedly glorious wall that we produced is as strong an endorsement of Porotherm as it is ever likely to get – a testament to the special design and properties of the system itself. Needing just a cursory coat of mortar, and for the blocks to be placed so that the interlocking grooves line up, the wall in question rose from the ground faster than a hurried Lazarus.

For those who are unfamiliar... this is the magical Porotherm block! Not sure who that man is.

For those who are unfamiliar... this is the magical Porotherm block! Not sure who that man is.

Okay, so even with Porotherm and an experienced builder on hand, it probably wouldn’t be realistic to expect to put up the walls of a house in a day – but they could probably get pretty close! At this point I should mention that much of my own wall-based endeavour, and indeed that of my team for the day, was precipitated by Wienerberger’s resident Porotherm master, Darren Bould, having completed the tricky technical work on the base in true here’s-one-I-did-earlier Blue Peter style.

Even so, it was still a bit of a shock to find myself and others to be so competent in building this wall, not to mention the first-hand experience of working with a system that could well herald a sea-change in the way the industry approaches everyday construction. But the day wasn’t just an opportunity for me to release my long repressed inner brickie; it also gave the firmest foundation (sorry) possible on which to build (sorry) a castle (sorry) of PR.

As any agency knows, gaining the knowledge and understanding of a client’s offering to market is simply invaluable; a fundamental tenant of effective and momentum-generating public relations work. Which is why, despite ending the day with my coat caked in clay dust, my shoes flecked with mortar like a bad attempt at Jackson Pollock-lite footwear, and having not sent an email all day, those four hours of Porotherm immersion will prove to be the most useful and productive PR outing I’ve had all year.

‘Like giving a monkey a chainsaw’? Footballers, Twitter and the strange tale of Joey Barton

Twitter is today’s PR weapon of choice.  Spontaneous and direct, a tweet scythes through the traditional layers of media activity like a knife through butter, paradoxically personal and public at the same time. Unsurprisingly, businesses and marketing and PR agencies across the land are furiously tweeting to unlock the full commercial potential of the medium, many employing ingenious strategies to promote their clients. However, sometimes the best way to see how social media such as Twitter really works is to study those who use it solely for their own purposes; those seeking to give the public access to their personality in a way that might not otherwise be available.

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Obama’s ‘assassination’* gives Fox News a red face

Oops – another Twitter episode for the blooper reel. One of Fox News’ verified Twitter profiles @FoxNewsPolitics was hacked today (probably by Script Kiddie according to the Beeb) and proceeded to announce the (fake and frankly tasteless) assassination of President Barack Obama. Ouch.

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